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Dear Barry,

I wanted to share some exciting things that have been happening lately.

I take my PGTAA certification very seriously and it has always been my mission to share my passion, knowledge, and skills in as many different ways as possible.

Two recent things that I wanted to share with you are, the attached letter is from Kevin Long with The First Tee Fort Worth about my classification as a certified life skills coach. This gives me the ability to share my passion with young people and inspire a new generation to not only love golf but to be stronger individuals.

Also, this month at the GIS in San Antonio I was honored to be named Superintendent of the Year for 2017 by Turfnet/Syngenta. This award is a great honor for me and helps me to spread my passion for golf and leadership into the industry professions.

I just wanted to share these accomplishments with you in order to express my gratitude for what the PGTAA, and you, have enabled me to do. We need more positivity in this world and teaching through golf allows me to contribute to this.

Best Regards,

Jorge Croda
jorgecroda@yahoo.com
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What is your view on "pressure?"

How have you played in pressure moments in the past?

Some golfers see pressure as negative and describe tough rounds as nerve-wracking or anxiety-ridden. These golfers tend to fall apart when they start feeling even low levels of pressure.

For these golfers, pressure escalates quickly and throws off their game dramatically. These golfers have difficulty focusing on their shot because all they can think about is, "What if I hit a bad shot?" Or, "What if I miss this putt?"

When you see pressure as a negative thing, the pressure becomes your dominant focus instead of just playing the game or the shot in front of you.

There are two things you should know about pressure:

1. A little bit of pressure is a good thing. Pressure can become a motivating force that allows you to place all your efforts and focus on the present moment.

2. You have the ability to set the pressure thermostat. You can keep the pressure in the optimal range by viewing situations as challenges, learning how to effectively focus and utilizing relaxation strategies when necessary.

A good example of effectively managing pressure is the 2018 Farmers Insurance Open.

The Open was an epic drama. Jason Day and Alex Noren battled four rounds and 6 playoff holes before a winner was declared.

Talk about pressure... The six-hole playoff was the longest playoff in the tournament's 67-year history.

To add to the pressure, Day was seeking to climb back to the No. 1 ranking for the first time since 2016 while Noren was looking for his first PGA Tour win.

Day and Noren matched each other on the first five playoff holes; birdie, birdie, par, par and birdie. Just then, the golfers were informed they would have to continue the playoff the following day due to darkness.

So, after grinding through five playoff holes, Day and Noren would have an entire night to think about what was at stake.

It took only one additional playoff hole and an 18-inch birdie putt for Day to claim the title on Monday morning.

This type of pressure would make many golfers crumble. Interestingly enough, Day and Noren stayed composed.

Neither golfer spoke a word about pressure after the fifth playoff hole. Noren commented on the excitement of the playoff.

NOREN: "Too dark right now, I could barely see the last putt. Very enjoyable. This is what I play for."

Day also appeared calm and ready for the battle to continue the next day.

DAY: "Alex [Noren] is playing some tremendous golf. I'll try to get some rest and play all day tomorrow if I need to get a win."

Day and Noren embraced the pressure and you can learn to do the same.

Let pressure be your friend rather than your foe, that way, pressure can work for you instead of against you.

How to Manage Pressure in Competition:

Don’t try to be better than your best. Some golfers try too hard which only increases pressure for themselves. Avoiding cramming for the big game.

Embrace the pressure as this is the reason you love to play. Make the added Adrenalin work for you. Know that you are going to feel pumped up and that's a normal reaction.

By PGTAA Member Dr. Patrick Cohn
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PGTAA Endorsed Products

Cohn Certification

THE PGTAA MISSION STATEMENT

  • To maintain the prestige, status and dignity of the profession;
  • To regulate the exercise of the profession;
  • To encourage and promote efficiency in and responsibility in relation to the profession;
  • To deal with all matters relating to the interests of the profession and to protect those interests;
  • To uphold the integrity of the practitioners;
  • To uphold and improve the standards of professional conduct and qualifications of practitioners;
  • To provide for the effective control of the professional conduct of the practitioners;
  • To promote uniform practice and discipline among practitioners;
  • To encourage the study of the golf game and profession;
  • To represent generally the views of the profession; In the interests of the profession, to co-operate with such other associations or bodies of persons as it may deem fit;
  • To publish brochures, journals, web sites or publications and conclude arrangements with other persons to publicize the activities of the association and its members and to disseminate matters of interest to members;
  • To develop golf teachers and coaches with a meaningful and in-depth knowledge of:
    1. instructional expertise golf techniques emphasizing the short game communications skills -i.e. the ability to articulate well with the student, fellow instructors and media representatives leadership qualities club-fitting
    2. rules and etiquette of golf
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