By PGTAA member Dr. Patrick Cohn

What three mental components contribute most to playing your best golf?

Quite simply, the three most impactful to peak play are focus, focus and focus!

Bad shots, meltdowns, slumps and under performance are caused by a lack of focus or a misplaced focus.

If you cannot stay on task and regroup, you will not be able to play on with a calm mind.

A golfer who completed our Golf Mental Game Survey asked a common question:

"When I make a bad shot, how do I put it behind me fully and make a good shot next?"

Hitting a bad shot is not the problem. Have you ever played a round of golf without hitting a bad shot? No! Have you ever watched another golfer play a mistake-free round? No! Bad shots are part of the game.

Somehow, bad shots can stick around in your head for several holes or even the entire round. You can see images of yourself unraveling even before it happens.

You can feel the anxiety build. Your heart is pounding out of your chest. Already, you have several distractions competing for your attention. When you are focused on negative images, you cannot focus on setting up your next shot.

When you are focused on the feeling of anxiety, you cannot immerse yourself in the current shot. When you are focused on the last shot, you cannot focus on how you want to hit the current shot.

Putting the shot fully behind you requires you to focus forward. In other words, what do I need to do, how will I do it and when will I do it?

Focusing was the mental edge that Bryson DeChambeau needed to earn his first Master's tournament victory at the 2020 US Open.

Towards the end of his first round, DeChambeau displayed a moment of frustration exclaiming, "These greens suck. They're so bad."

So how did DeChambeau go from frustrated and tied for 14th place after Round One to carding a 3-under 67 and winning his first major championship? The difference lies in DeChambeau's ability to focus or, more specifically, refocus.

DeCHAMBEAU: "On 9 was when I first thought, 'OK, this could be a reality.' I made that long eagle putt and shocked myself making it, too. I thought to myself I could do it, and then immediately after I said, 'Nope, you gotta focus on each and every hole.' I just kept telling myself 'Nope, we've got three more holes, we've got four more holes, we've got five more holes.' Whatever it was, I just had to keep focused, make sure I was executing every shot the best I possibly could."

As you can see, your focus is a choice. To be in charge of your mental game, you must make a conscious choice to focus on your strategy, preshot routine or something that keeps you grounded in the present.

If get off task, you're responsible for refocusing attention to what matters: the current shot.

How to Refocus After a Poor Shot:

Start be being more aware of your triggers or mistakes that get your upset during the round.

What's the expectation you have about that bad shot? "I should never three putt from 20'." Replace with: "Even the best golfers three putt. I'm still a good putter."

Let go of the expectation that leads to your emotional turmoil. Remind yourself: "That shot is over. Let's get back on track. Focus."

Take control of your reaction to mistakes. You have the ability to choose how you respond to mistakes. Make the right choice!
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Essential Tools to Catapult your Teaching Business to Higher Revenues
The PGTAA has arranged discounts for you should you avail yourself to our preferred vendors.

PGTAA Endorsed Products

Cohn Certification

Become a Golf Mental Coach

Golfers Mental Edge Program

Cohn Certification

Increase you credibility & income
Specializing in kids

Web Design, SEO & Online Marketing Services

Visualwebz.com

Web Design | SEO | Online Marketing

For great website design and maintenance

JC Video

Golf Analysis Video

Booking System, Organizer, Management System & Training Diary

Special PGTAA pricing for all your teaching & training aids.

 

MEMBERSHIP LEVELS OF THE PGTAA

THE CLASS A PGTAA MASTER TEACHING PROFESSIONAL designation is awarded upon the SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION of the:

The Certified Class A PGTAA Master Golf Teaching Professional

All Class A PGTAA Master Golf Teaching Professionals have earned this designation through hard work and a commitment and desire to improve their student’s golf game and a desire to further excellence in golf teaching.
They have earned the right to call themselves a “Certified Class A PGTAA Master Golf Teaching Professional,” and have demonstrated a teaching knowledge and ability to the highest order.

You can click here to download the Fully Certified Member logo

The PGTAA Associate Member

PGTAA Associate Members are those members currently studying for their Class A PGTAA Master Teaching Professional Designation. They may have completed their written examination successfully but not completed their PAT requirements and vice versa. An Associate member may give lessons provided he identifies himself with the words “Associate Member” when describing their PGTAA membership status.

An associate member is not allowed to describe themselves as a “PGTAA Professional” or a “Certified Class A Professional teacher/member,” for example.

Allowable phraseology would be similar to: “PGTAA Associate Member Teaching Professional” and “PGTAA Associate Member.”

You can click here to download the Associate Member logo 

Positive SSL