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This year you, your family, and loved ones celebrate the 244th Independence Day in America, commemorating the Declaration of independence of the United States, on July 4, 1776.

The past year has been a hugely eventful one for us all. We are living through terrifying times but we must remain confident and positive that the future is a bright and sunny one for us, our families, and our loved ones.

This special day is indeed a time for reflection for not only Americans but for the whole world.

It is certainly a time for us to reflect on how we have treated the world and its inhabitants in the past and how we should treat the world and its inhabitants in the future.
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From PGTAA member Dr. Patrick Cohn

Do you become increasingly nervous as you prepare to putt? Are you afraid of hitting bad shots while you address the ball?

Chances are that your thoughts are major distractions interfering with your body's ability to make a confident swing.

Thinking too much about strategy, score, mechanics, weather, greens, spectators, previous shots, leaderboard, or results disrupt your body's ability to swing your golf club freely, efficiently, and effectively.

In our Golf Mental Game Survey, one golfer brought up the topic of overthinking during competitive rounds:

"I freak out every time before I putt. I can't stop thinking about messing up. I try to talk myself through my putts, but I still miss easy putts. How can I calm down during shots?"

Your nervousness sprouts from overthinking or 'walking through your putts' and worrying about the potential outcome of your shot.

You know that worrisome feeling when the "what ifs" invade your mind. It is, as if, you time traveled into the future and watched the worst shot you ever hit. When you think too much, you lose your touch.

Overthinking traps you in an overwhelming cycle of thinking about what might happen... Coaching yourself through your mechanics... Reminding yourself of what NOT to do... Losing focus.

When you 'freak out' about your shots, your body tenses, you grip the putter harder, and you take extra time before you strike the ball. That delay before hitting the ball exacerbates the problem by giving you more time to over-think and over-analyze your shot.

When you panic about your shot, you signal to your brain that you are not ready for the putt. This thought distraction makes your stroke feel unnatural and forced, causing you to push the ball wide of the hole or leave the ball short.

The most effective way to overcome your anxiety is to take charge of your thoughts rather than allow your thoughts to take over your performance.

For example, PGA golfer Collin Morikawa has improved his putting game by tuning out thought distractions and immersing himself in the act of putting.

MORIKAWA: "It was just to be more of an athlete, be an athlete that reacts to your target. You look at all other sports, basketball, you think basketball, they're always looking at their target. I thought of Jordan Spieth when I was putting, when he used to look at his target, he was reacting...."

"That's all he does. He takes a couple quick looks if you look at his pre-shot routine, a couple quick looks, doesn't stand over it too long, but he's committed and he just reacts to the target. And I think before I was so focused on speed or I was so focused on trying to hit this great putt that I just wasn't reacting to what I was doing."

Reacting or immersing yourself in your shot requires trust. Trust doesn't magically happen when you play a competitive round.

Playing a round of golf is not the time to 'fix' your swing. Trust is developed in practice. When you have trust, you are hitting the ball with confidence.

Tip to Gain Trust in your Golf Game:

(1) You can't think about the what-ifs--what if I miss this putt.

(2) Focus on your routine when putting or hitting shots, not the outcome.

(3) Over the ball, you must focus on the target on where you want to hit the ball or putt.

(4) Trust your muscle memory to hit the shot and avoid self-coaching or overthinking
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PGTAA Endorsed Products

Cohn Certification

PGTAA’S WORLDWIDE

The PGTAA’s Worldwide Presence

The PGTAA is the single largest golf teaching organization in the world.

“Accredited, Accepted & Recognized Worldwide”©

world_im1

Okinawa, Japan 2003 – Sonny Gibbs (left)

The PGTAA continues to mature into the world’s best teaching program and its acceptance worldwide is evidenced by the superior quality of its Master Teaching Professionals around the globe.

The PGTAA Newsletter, published quarterly, offers ideas and input from around the world that broadens your perspectives, exposes you to teaching methodologies incorporated in different cultures and sharpens your professional skills.

Listed below alphabetically are all the PGTAA worldwide divisions’ professionals ready to improve your golf skills. Please feel free to contact them for further details about the PGTAA, how to become a Master Teaching Professional or to take lessons.

pg_imageAustralian Division
Paul Kang
Aust1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Brazil Division
Juan Malaret
Braz1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Chinese Division
William Kao
China1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image French Division
Benoit Green
France1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Great Britain Division
Damian Donnelly
uk1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image India Divisio
M & A Singh
India1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Israeli Division
Michael Rosenberg
Israel@pgtaa.com

pg_image Jamaica Division
Jason Lopez
Jamaica@pgtaa.com

pg_image Mexican Division
Sergio Poo Gomez
Mexico1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image New Zealand Division
Robert McDonald
NZ1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Puerto Rico Division
Michael Haney
PuertoR1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image South African Division
Lionel Wearne
lionelwearneATgmail.com

pg_image Swiss Division
Brigitte Cappelletti
Swiss1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Thailand Division
Keeratika Waugh
Thai1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Czech Division
Veronika Patočková
vercapatockova@seznam.cz

pg_imageAustrian Division
Karl Schuhbeck
AusATpgtaa.com

pg_imageArgentine Division
Patricio Lopez
Arg1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Canadian Division
Gerard Coons
Canada1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Dutch Division
Johan Schwemmer
Dutch1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image German Division
Johannes Horcher
Germany1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Hong Kong Division
Benny To Lam
hkong1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Irish Division
Dermot Dalton
Irish1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Japanese Division
Sonny Gibbs
Japan@pgtaa.com

pg_image Malaysia Division
Chris Kwan
Malay1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Middle East Division
Marty Cowal
Me1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Portuguese Division
Noel Mitchell
Portugal1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Scottish Division
Tom McCaffery
Scot1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Spanish Division
Christian Pulz
spain1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image Singapore Division
Bruce McGrath
Sing1ATpgtaa.com

pg_image USA Division
Brandon Conway
admissionsATpgtaa.com

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